philine

18 Feb 2020 211 views
 
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photoblog image Sir Henry Elwes in Colesbourne Park

Sir Henry Elwes in Colesbourne Park

 

He guided us through his estate, Colesbourne Park. on a sunday with strong winds (Storm Ciara) and heavy rain - I think he is a real English man of tradition and high education: hardy and stoic, modest, charming and witty, gardener and gentleman ...  As I said to him "It was an honour to be guided by Henry Elwes" (the 'Sir' was not mentioned on his name sign), he said slightly smiling "It is always a pleasure to me to guide such nice galanthophiles like you." 

 

"Sir Henry William George Elwes KCVO KStJ JP DL (born 24 October 1935) is a retired British politician and public servant. He served as a District and County Councillor in Gloucestershire for 32 years and was Lord Lieutenant of Gloucestershire between 1992 and 2010.

Elwes married Carolyn Cripps in 1962. They live in Colesbourne Park, an estate owned by his family since 1600. The botanist Henry John Elwes is his great-grandfather."

"The great plantsman, Henry John Elwes planted widely, and the garden today contains magnificent populations of snowdrops, many of them hybrids, descended from those original plantings. The present day collection has been built up over the years through purchases, gifts and exchanges with other collectors such as Herbert Ransom, who grew snowdrops for the Giant Snowdrop Company, and galanthophiles such as Ruth Birchall, Primrose Warburg and Richard Nutt. Carolyn and Henry Elwes, and more recently Shane Ball and Will Fletcher plant out thousands of snowdrops each year and new varieties are added when possible. With the collection now totalling some 350 cultivars, though not all are on display at the same time. Colesbourne Park is renowned as one of the best places to see large groups of choice snowdrops. According to Country Life (1999) it is ‘England’s greatest snowdrop garden.’"

 

"Galanthus elwesii (Elwes's snowdrop, greater snowdrop) is one of a number of species of the genus Galanthus, herbaceous, perennial, bulbous plants belonging to the family Amaryllidaceae. It is a native of the Caucasus. G. elwesii was identified by the British botanist Henry John Elwes on a visit to Turkey in 1874. In early April, whilst in the mountains near Smyrna (modern Izmir), he came across "the fine large snowdrop which now bears my name". It was then formally described by Joseph Dalton Hooker (1875) and named G. elwesii, with an illustration by W H Fitch in Curtis's Botanical Magazine, and thus the species bears his name as the botanical authority. Later the plants collected by Elwes were found to actually be G. gracilis but the name was retained for a different specimen."

 

"Galanthus 'Green Tear' is an incredibly precious and expensive snowdrop that belongs to the virescent group; the green snowdrops. The cultivar name "Green Tear" describes the variety extremely aptly when it is in bud."

 

Sorry, it was raining so heavily that some raindrops fell on my camera.

Sir Henry Elwes in Colesbourne Park

 

He guided us through his estate, Colesbourne Park. on a sunday with strong winds (Storm Ciara) and heavy rain - I think he is a real English man of tradition and high education: hardy and stoic, modest, charming and witty, gardener and gentleman ...  As I said to him "It was an honour to be guided by Henry Elwes" (the 'Sir' was not mentioned on his name sign), he said slightly smiling "It is always a pleasure to me to guide such nice galanthophiles like you." 

 

"Sir Henry William George Elwes KCVO KStJ JP DL (born 24 October 1935) is a retired British politician and public servant. He served as a District and County Councillor in Gloucestershire for 32 years and was Lord Lieutenant of Gloucestershire between 1992 and 2010.

Elwes married Carolyn Cripps in 1962. They live in Colesbourne Park, an estate owned by his family since 1600. The botanist Henry John Elwes is his great-grandfather."

"The great plantsman, Henry John Elwes planted widely, and the garden today contains magnificent populations of snowdrops, many of them hybrids, descended from those original plantings. The present day collection has been built up over the years through purchases, gifts and exchanges with other collectors such as Herbert Ransom, who grew snowdrops for the Giant Snowdrop Company, and galanthophiles such as Ruth Birchall, Primrose Warburg and Richard Nutt. Carolyn and Henry Elwes, and more recently Shane Ball and Will Fletcher plant out thousands of snowdrops each year and new varieties are added when possible. With the collection now totalling some 350 cultivars, though not all are on display at the same time. Colesbourne Park is renowned as one of the best places to see large groups of choice snowdrops. According to Country Life (1999) it is ‘England’s greatest snowdrop garden.’"

 

"Galanthus elwesii (Elwes's snowdrop, greater snowdrop) is one of a number of species of the genus Galanthus, herbaceous, perennial, bulbous plants belonging to the family Amaryllidaceae. It is a native of the Caucasus. G. elwesii was identified by the British botanist Henry John Elwes on a visit to Turkey in 1874. In early April, whilst in the mountains near Smyrna (modern Izmir), he came across "the fine large snowdrop which now bears my name". It was then formally described by Joseph Dalton Hooker (1875) and named G. elwesii, with an illustration by W H Fitch in Curtis's Botanical Magazine, and thus the species bears his name as the botanical authority. Later the plants collected by Elwes were found to actually be G. gracilis but the name was retained for a different specimen."

 

"Galanthus 'Green Tear' is an incredibly precious and expensive snowdrop that belongs to the virescent group; the green snowdrops. The cultivar name "Green Tear" describes the variety extremely aptly when it is in bud."

 

Sorry, it was raining so heavily that some raindrops fell on my camera.

comments (11)

Thank you for this, Philine! So wonderful!
Philine: Many thanks, Elizabeth!
  • Chris
  • England
  • 18 Feb 2020, 06:46
Delighted to see him Philine, he is a real old fashioned example of Englishness..
Philine: We all had the same thought - many thanks, Chris!
En voilà  une belle rencontre , j'aime ces personnes qui ont tant à  raconter , merci
Philine: Merci beaucoup, Claudine!
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 18 Feb 2020, 07:44
Such a shame you had bad weather for the visit, Philine. I see people are able to keep their umbrellas up!
Philine: Yes, it was an awful weather, but we forgot it while following Sir Henry Elwes. Other gardens were closed on this day, but he guided us through his empire. I myself had also my umbrella kept up. The rain was worse than the wind. Many thanks, Lisl!
It is hard to imagine the same family living in a house for over 400 years.
Philine: This is traditional Englishness as Chris said. Many thanks, Bill!
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 18 Feb 2020, 08:20
How lovely that you were guided personally. Yes, Sir Henry is very much "old" school" and has the British "stiff upper lip" when faced with adversity. The weather from Storm Ciara and Storm Dennis has not stopped me getting out to embrace the elements. I'm sorry that you saw England is less than ideal conditions for your trip with fellow galanthophiles.
Philine: You are also such a hardy, stoic Englishman - but look also at Sir Elwes' dressing! Not all people of our group followed him, some preferred to visit the tearoom and the giftshop. Many thanks, Alan!
  • Chad
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 18 Feb 2020, 09:54
He is obviously very devoted to his garden.
Philine: Yes, he is indeed, but also very modest in his behaviour. Many thanks, Chad! You as Gloucestershire inhabitant might know him.
What a thrill this must have been for you, Philine.
Philine: It was a real pleasure to be guided by Sir Henry Elwes. Many thanks, Care!
How nice to be taken round by the man himself, what a shame about the weather though.
Philine: Yes, I found this very friendly, too. Yesterday evening there was a longer reportage of our official tv about the bad flooding in England after the storms. We know similar problems in some parts of our country. Many thanks, Brian!
you had a fine looking guide in the park Philine... i like the picture of him giving you the flower....petersmile
Philine: He was only showing, not giving - many thanks, peter!
These English gents know their stuff - I recall being on a bird-watching trip with Sir John Craster in Northumberland, who was very knowledgeable about the local birds, and with Sir Alec Douglas Home's brother on the family estate on the borders - he, too, was knowledgeable about birds, trees, shrubs, flowers - a walking encyclopedia.!
Philine: Interesting comment - these gentlemen are real examples of old Englishness. Many thanks, Prof. Wilson!

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