philine

27 Feb 2020 39 views
 
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photoblog image Snowdrops or snowflakes?

Snowdrops or snowflakes?

 

These are Snowflakes or Märzenbecher in German - I saw them in such a plenty around a water castle near Münster, my hometown, on last Monday, whereas the snowdrops seem to be soon ending their bloom. In England I didn't see such meadows full of wild snowflakes.

 

"Snowdrops and snowflakes are often confused – and not just because of the similarity of their names.

 They bear white, bell-shaped flowers with a touch of green that nod toward the ground. Both grow from very small bulbs, bought and planted in the fall and they are usually long-lived.
 

But they belong to two different species of plants. The common snowdrops we plant are botanically Galanthus nivalis. The snowflakes are botanically Leucojum aestivum.

Typically, snowdrops bloom in January or early February, making it a true winter flower that is greatly appreciated when other things are still dormant.

The snowflake typically blooms in March and April and is always welcome for its contrast with the bigger, bolder late daffodils and early tulips. The little bell-shaped flowers are distinctive for the green dots around the tips of the flower petals. Each stem bears more than one flower – sometimes six or eight – at the top of stems, which are 18 to 24 inches tall. This is a very worthy plant, and can hold its own even with the competition of major spring flowers looking their best and brightest."

There are only two sorts of snowflakes, but more thasn 1000 sorts of snowdrops - a bit strange, isn't it?

 

Sorry, I cannot comment today, for I am taking part in a dagje-uit to Nederland.

Snowdrops or snowflakes?

 

These are Snowflakes or Märzenbecher in German - I saw them in such a plenty around a water castle near Münster, my hometown, on last Monday, whereas the snowdrops seem to be soon ending their bloom. In England I didn't see such meadows full of wild snowflakes.

 

"Snowdrops and snowflakes are often confused – and not just because of the similarity of their names.

 They bear white, bell-shaped flowers with a touch of green that nod toward the ground. Both grow from very small bulbs, bought and planted in the fall and they are usually long-lived.
 

But they belong to two different species of plants. The common snowdrops we plant are botanically Galanthus nivalis. The snowflakes are botanically Leucojum aestivum.

Typically, snowdrops bloom in January or early February, making it a true winter flower that is greatly appreciated when other things are still dormant.

The snowflake typically blooms in March and April and is always welcome for its contrast with the bigger, bolder late daffodils and early tulips. The little bell-shaped flowers are distinctive for the green dots around the tips of the flower petals. Each stem bears more than one flower – sometimes six or eight – at the top of stems, which are 18 to 24 inches tall. This is a very worthy plant, and can hold its own even with the competition of major spring flowers looking their best and brightest."

There are only two sorts of snowflakes, but more thasn 1000 sorts of snowdrops - a bit strange, isn't it?

 

Sorry, I cannot comment today, for I am taking part in a dagje-uit to Nederland.

comments (10)

Ces fleurs ressemblent un peu au muguet.
A very slight difference.... but they too are wonderful! Thank you for all the education!
  • Chris
  • England
  • 27 Feb 2020, 06:45
You have photographed these in perfect condition Philine
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 27 Feb 2020, 07:05
Our snowdrops are getting past their best now but still make for an attractive display.

What's a dagje-uit?
Philine: dagje-uit is english day-out, but I love the Dutch words with the diminuitivum -je. Many thanks, Alan! I visitedtoday Castle Amerongen and House Doorn where Emperor Willhelm II lived in Exile after 1918. Sadly, we had awful weather, only rain.
J'adore ces perce-neige , nous n'en vons pas par chez nous ..
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 27 Feb 2020, 07:29
Understated loveliness...
I never knew that! I thought they were all snowdrops.

Enjoy your day out in the Netherlands
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 27 Feb 2020, 08:02
You must love Snowflakes, too, Philine
  • Chad
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 27 Feb 2020, 08:31
I have not heard of snowflakes. A rather nice term and we definitely do not have any at home.
I have never seen them before but they are a delightful sight.

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